MCAS Cherry Point

HURRICANE FLORENCE RECOVERY: TESTING THE MARINE CORPS’ RESILIENCE

January 14, 2019

 
Hurricane Florence approaches the coast of NC MCAS Cherry Point still recovering
From working in comprised facilities and temporary trailers to repairing damaged homes, the Marine Corps community continues to face daily challenges following Hurricane Florence. Although the storm made landfall on September 14, 2018, Marines at Marine Corps Base (MCB) Camp Lejeune, Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) New River, and MCAS Cherry Point are still recovering. <<<READ MORE
(By Maj. Simba Chigwida, Marine Corps Installations Command, MCICOM)
 

FRC East to Celebrate 75th Anniversary

October 16, 2018

 

HAVELOCK, NC (WITN) The largest industrial employer east of I-95 is preparing to celebrate 75 years of successful support for our nation’s military.  The Fleet Readiness Center East opened in 1943 at the Marine Corp Air Station Cherry Point. >>READ MORE

 

FRC East Achieves Another F-35 Milestone

June 19, 2018

 

MARINE CORPS AIR STATION CHERRY POINT, N.C. — The first Air Force F-35A Lightning II, AF-10, inducted at Fleet Readiness Center East for modifications departed for the 33rd Fighter Wing at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, on June 7, 2018.

The departure of the jet represents another successful milestone, demonstrating FRC East depot capability to perform heavy maintenance at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point.  The Depot has now received, modified and returned all variants of the fifth generation aircraft.

FRC East is the primary depot source of repair for both F-35B and F-35C variant workloads, while serving as a backup depot repair facility for the F-35A variant.

The first Air Force F-35A Lightning II, AF-10, inducted at Fleet Readiness Center East for modifications departed Florida in June.

The command inducted the first A- and C-variants in August and November 2017, respectively. The aircraft underwent structural, mechanical and software modifications to standardize these aircraft to the current production configurations.  The modifications improve capability and increase lethality of the F-35 variants.

The F-35C, Navy variant, is one of the 10 aircraft designated by the Navy to meet its goal of initial operating capability by August 2018.

“FRC East has successfully demonstrated capability on all F-35 variants,” said Donald Jeter, F-35 Program manager.

 

Pentagon And Lockheed Martin Deliver 300th F-35 Aircraft

June 12, 2018

 

FORT WORTH, Texas, June 11, 2018 – The F-35 Joint Program Office and Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] delivered the 300th production F-35 aircraft, demonstrating the program’s continued progress and momentum. The 300th aircraft is a U.S. Air Force F-35A, to be delivered to Hill Air Force Base, Utah.

 

“The F-35 weapons system is a key enabler of our National Defense Strategy and is providing our warfighters the combat proven, advanced capabilities they need to meet mission requirements,” said Vice Admiral Mat Winter, program executive officer for the F-35 Joint Program Office. “The 300th production aircraft delivery is a significant milestone that highlights the effective F-35 Enterprise collaboration across the JPO, U.S. services, partners and industry. Moving forward, our F-35 team remains committed to driving costs down, quality up and faster delivery timelines across our development, production and sustainment lines of effort.”

The first 300 F-35s include 197 F-35A conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) variants, 75 F-35B short takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) variants, and 28F-35C carrier variants (CV) and have been delivered to U.S. and international customers. More than 620 pilots and 5,600 maintainers have been trained, and the F-35 fleet has surpassed more than 140,000 cumulative flight hours.

>>READ MORE

 

Watch: Lockheed Martin F-35B Tests Vertical Landing in North Carolina

January 29, 2018

 

The Lockheed Martin F-35B is taking to the skies at Marine Corps Auxiliary Landing Field (MCALF) Bogue in North Carolina. According to Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Cherry Point, the short-takeoff-and-vertical-landing fighter is scheduled to conduct sloped surface vertical-landing tests through late February.

The Marine Corp. hopes the tests, conducted by the F-35 Patuxent River Integrated Test Force (ITF) team, will expand the expeditionary envelope for the F-35B, MCAS Cherry Point said.

“We hope to be able to relax the landing pad certification limits in terms of maximum slope/gradients in the context of expeditionary pads — existing and future,” said Bob Nantz, F-35 Pax River ITF Performance/Environmental Technical Specialist.

For the sloped surface vertical landings tests, Marines from 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing at MCAS Cherry Point and MCALF Bogue built four expeditionary landing pads of different slopes: left, right, forward and back. The pads were constructed out of material similar to the AM-2 matting, according to the U.S. Naval Air Systems Command (Navair). Marines use the material to build expeditionary runways or landing pads while on deployment.

MCAS Cherry Point said the test team will assess how well the F-35B operates on varying slopes in different combinations of environmental and takeoff/landing conditions.

During the month of testing, the Pax River ITF is set to analyze nearly 200 data test points. Navair said this includes how well the F-35B operates on varying slopes, impacts of head and tailwinds, and the effect of aft center of gravity in conjunction with ground slopes. MCAS Cherry Point said testing is done on a graduated basis, which means that the program starts by conducting less risk tests and increases from there.

According to Maj. Michael Lippert, F-35 Pax River ITF test pilot and detachment officer-in-charge, some test results will be instantaneous, as real-time lessons learned are capture. Other results will require more attention, as much of the data needs to undergo significant analysis before any actions are taken.

“These updates will eventually make it to our fleet aircraft while the capabilities of the F-35 will continue to transform the way we fight and win,” Lippert said.

If conditions are ideal and the schedule goes as written, however, the testing could wrap up sooner. When the tests are complete, the aircraft and test team are to depart MCALF Bogue and head back to Pax River in Maryland.

“Bogue is a unique testing location because the expeditionary landing field and the landing pads were constructed entirely by Marines. Conducting the testing at Bogue Field provides the Marine Corps with an opportunity to continue the test and development of the F-35 in the STOVL mode, while simultaneously exercising components of the MAGTF’s Air Combat Element, specifically the Marine Wing Support Squadrons resident aboard Bogue and MCAS Cherry Point,” MCAS Cherry Point told R&WI. “This is significant because it demonstrates the ability for our Marines and their equipment to precisely build expeditionary sites suitable for the conduct of F-35 operations and showcases the unique skillsets these organizations have.”